Saturday, December 12, 2015  6:00 PM

Mt. Hope United Church of Christ
2400 Mt. Hope Church Rd
Whitsett, NC

There will be a Pot Luck Supper. Please bring a side dish and an unwrapped door prize. Don’t forget your instrument for jamming!


Bethesda Bluegrass

Bethesda Bluegrass

Bethesda Bluegrass started in 2005 in Durham, North Carolina as a family group called the Bethesda Bluegrass Boys, consisting of brothers Caleb, Jackson, and Connor Hagwood and father Mark on guitar.  The boys took music lessons together and played and sang for church functions, birthday celebrations and retirement communities for several years. They continued to expand their horizons to small stages, radio stations and venues around North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.   They officially changed their band name in 2010 to Bethesda Bluegrass to more accurately reflect the makeup of the band.  The name “Bethesda” comes from a tight-knit community in Durham, North Carolina, where the Hagwood family resides.

They’ve won top awards at the NC State Fair, NC AgFest, Lil’ John’s Mountain Music Festival, and numerous fiddlers’ conventions.  2013 was a very good year for Bethesda Bluegrass, winning 1st place at the 2013 NC State Fair Folk Festival Senior Band Competition and taking 2nd place in the Adult Bluegrass Band Competition at Hoppin’ John’s Fiddler’s Convention. Each band member has succeeded at bringing home a few wins for individual performances throughout the years.

Caleb, the oldest of the Hagwood brothers, plays bass and sings lead for the band.  He is currently employed at a funeral home in Durham as he pursues his academics in Funeral Service at Fayetteville Technical Community College. Jackson plays banjo and is the lead singer.  He works in the auto salvage business as he is completing his schooling at Durham Technical Community College in the Automotive program.  He is working on restoring a 1962 Chevy II.  Playing mandolin for the band is the youngest brother, Connor.  He works hard building fences for a family-owned business in the area.  He plans to enroll at Durham Technical Community College next semester and pursue Business.


Friday and Saturday,  October 23-24, 2015

 Hagan-Stone Park Campground
5920 Hagan-Stone Park Road
Pleasant Garden NC 27313

We have been invited by some fine folks camping there to join their Camp-o-ween. Y’all come! Kids will be trick or treating Saturday evening at the campground. Be sure to be careful and look out for them as you drive in!

Trick Or Treating on Saturday beginning at dusk (prior to the concert)

Look for is in the far right corner of the campground in sites 31-33. We will have lots of tents and lights for the concert and jamming!

Performing Friday starting at 8 PM:

Flint Hill 

Flint Hill

Flint Hill bluegrass band formed in March of this year. Although they are a new band, their talents fit together like a glove. At their first fiddlers convention they took home first place in Seagrove, NC. They have played multiple churches, birthday parties, private events and fiddler’s conventions. The lead singer and guitar player of the band is Chris Poole from Thomasville NC. He is a rising sophomore at Ledford High School. He enjoys singing in his church, riding horses and FFA. Adam Frazier plays bass and sings baritone. He enjoys bluegrass, working on tractors and farming. Mark Burgess is on the mandolin. He enjoys going to multiple bluegrass festivals each year, hunting and fishing. He has been in the bluegrass world for 42 years. Larry Williams plays Dobro and sings bass. He has been in and around bluegrass his whole life. He enjoys bluegrass festivals, Dobro’s, squirrel hunting and church. Last but not least, the banjo player and tenor singer of the band, Chance Parrish. He enjoys farming, working on tractors and playing music. The band will be joined by Daniel Greeson, age 18, from Jamestown, NC. He was able to join these guys recently while playing a at church music festival and had a great time playing with their band on August 16th just before heading to East Tennessee State to study traditional music this fall.

Performing Saturday starting at 8 PM:

Hill Family Band

Hill FamilyThe Hill Family Band is a Bluegrass/Gospel Band from Sanford, North Carolina. Members of the band include father Chris on bass, mother Jan on vocals, and brothers John Michael on guitar/vocals, Samuel on fiddle, and Jacob on mandolin/vocals. The Hill Family Band performs on a regular basis all around Central NC. It is their joy to bless others with the gift of music. The boys are award winning musicians, receiving awards at fiddler conventions and festivals all around the Carolinas and Virginia, including recent wins at the 80th Annual Old Fiddler’s Convention youth competition held in Galax, Virginia. They played for High Lonesome Strings last year at the Camp n’ Pick in September. It will be great to see how they have grown musically!


Sunday,  September 20, 2015 @ 2pm

Piedmont Triad Farmers Market
2914 Sandy Ridge Road
Colfax, NC 
The event will be held in the grass area between Buildings E and F
Presenting our very special guests:

The Wood Family Tradition

Wood Family TraditionFamily values, legacy, faith, and humor are just a few things that Wood Family Tradition brings as a newly formed family band in the bluegrass genre. Music, however, is nothing new to this family. Stemming from the legacy of hard driving, traditional, and original bluegrass music that the legendary banjoist/singer/songwriter AL Wood and his band The Smokey Ridge Boys began in the 60’s, the members of this family band were raised on a strict diet of bluegrass and bluegrass gospel music. The Wood Family released their first album in January of 2015, containing 13 tracks of solid bluegrass material, most of which written by members of the family. Their album and other merchandise, along with pictures, bios, and their schedule, can be found on Facebook and on http://www.woodfamilytradition.com. The family keeps in touch with their friends and fans via their Facebook page, Wood Family Tradition.

Mike Wood began his musical career at the early age of 14 as guitar player for his father and renowned banjoist, Al Wood and The Smokey Ridge Boys. His first major show was playing the world famous Bill Monroe’s bluegrass festival at Bean Blossom, Indiana. Throughout the 80’s they played annual package shows with Bill Monroe, including regular performances at Fan Fair in Nashville, TN, and other venues in the Nashville area. During this time Mike was offered the once in a life time opportunity to join Bill Monroe as guitar player, but declined because of his obligation to raise his young family and not wanting to be away from home. Continuing to perform with his father’s band, Mike has performed at the 1982 World’s Fair in Knoxville, TN, as well as numerous bluegrass festivals and events throughout Florida, up and down the east coast and into Washington, DC. In the mid-80’s Mike joined as bass player with well-known mandolinist, Herschel Sizemore and the Country Grass, which lead him the opportunity to play the famous WWVA Jamboree in Wheeling, WV. Mike recorded three CD projects while with his father’s band and is currently a freelance musician. He also sings bluegrass-gospel with his wife and family band, The Wood Family Tradition. He has recently just finished playing guitar tracks on a project being released by songwriter, Ray Edwards, which includes Marty Raybon and other artists.

At the ripe age of 7, Jason Wood began to play guitar. Learning numerous fiddle tunes and standard guitar repertoire. At the age of 13, Jason began to play bass with his Grandfather, renowned banjoist and band leader, A.L. Wood. At the age of 17, Jason took a try at the mandolin. In 2009, Jason was fortunate enough to tour with Constant Change and perform at numerous places as well as record a live taping of Song Of the Mountains with legendary Curly Seckler. While a young musician, his experience and expertise has put him on a professional level. Jason has been told he has a setback as far as being a musician, but in his eyes he sees it as a blessing. For those of you who know him, he is left handed. Being a south paw has made it hard for Jason because good quality, left handed instruments are hard to find. Luckily, Jason was able to locate a mandolin luthier, Bob Altman of Altman Mandolins. Bob had agreed to build him a left handed mandolin, as this was his first “lefty”. Jason was thrilled when he got it. Truly a chip off the old block, as he has been told by his peers, referring to his Grandfather. Jason gives 100% credit for his musical and singing talents to Lord God. Secondly, his Dad, Mike Wood. Mike sat with Jason, numerous hours and showed him everything he knows about music. “If it were not for my Dad, I would not be playing music”, says Jason. Currently, Jason provides instructional lessons on Guitar and Mandolin. He also performs with local and distant groups as a fill in musician. He has worked with groups such as Audie Blaylock and Redline, Tim White, Grammy nominee James King, Jeff Whittington and The Brand New Opry Show!

Bobby Wood was born in 1962 in Iredell County North Carolina, being exposed to bluegrass music all of his life he didn’t pick up his first instrument until the age of 13 a guitar bought for him by his dad. While learning the basics of music on the guitar it was a few years later he traded his guitar for a mandolin. His first band experience was at the age of seventeen playing mandolin with ‘A Touch of Grass’ playing mostly close to home. It was 1982 when he started playing bass with his dad Al Wood and the Smokey Ridge Boys. This was truly an on the job learning experience for him that lasted four years after which Bobby played freelance bass and mandolin around home. Then in 1988 the opportunity came along to play mandolin with his dad which he immediately accepted. After a lot of wonderful years of recording, and playing with his dad at some of the biggest festivals in the country the most notable to him was Bill Monroe’s Bean Blossom festival he went on to play with some other great bands and perform all over the eastern U.S. ” The Long and Purdue Band” and “Dixie Creek Revival” and most recently as a member of “Ray Edwards and Hard Rock Mountain”, where he had the pleasure of playing mandolin on Ray’s new project “Portrait of a Bluegrass Songwriter”. Bobby is married and has three wonderful children and one grandchild he and his wife Lisa live in Mocksville, NC.

Mackenzie Wood was born in Shawnee, KS. As a child, she learned to sing from her grandmother, Norma Lee, who taught Mackenzie her very first songs, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” and “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot.” Mackenzie was a true born performer from the beginning, as she would go outside and sing as loud as she could until the neighbors came out to watch her. At a young age, she graced the stages as a dancer, and began competing and performing with the Dixie Bell Dance Troupe. While pursuing dance, Mackenzie never left singing behind. She first picked up the guitar at the age of 10 and would practice and sing for her friends and family. She also performed in the local community theatre, Theatre in the Park. Her most notable performances at TTIP include Footloose, The Wedding Singer, and Bye, Bye, Birdie. In her teenage years, dance became even more competitive, and she joined the LeDance Company, performing and competing in both dance and vocal all over the Midwest and Southeastern parts of the country. LeDance Company brought her to a national dance competition in Gatlinburg, Tennessee in 2008, and that is when she fell head over heels in love with BLUEGRASS!!! Gatlinburg was hosting a bluegrass event the same weekend she was there, and she was hooked from then on! After graduating from high school in 2008, Mackenzie moved to Missouri to pursue a college degree, and would attend Bluegrass shows and festivals whenever possible. Keeping up with her passion for musical theatre, Mackenzie starred in CATS and Big River at the Springfield Little University. She would also perform as a solo artist around the Springfield and Branson, Missouri area, singing country and bluegrass music. Now at this point you may be wondering where all of this led a Kansas girl to the Wood Family Tradition in North Carolina. Well, to put a long story short, Facebook and a looove connection! Jason and Mackenzie originally met on Facebook, and then in person at the Bluegrass and BBQ event at Silver Dollar City in Branson, MO. Six months later, they were in engaged and in June of 2012, they were joined in Holy Matrimony. It was a match made in heaven! Mackenzie fit in the Wood family right away, and has been singing with the family band for over a year! She brings tenor and high baritone harmonies, lead vocals, and good meals. Did we mention how good of a cook she is? She also does the merchandise, marketing, and assists in bookings for the band!

Joanie Wood sang with her Mother and Grandmother in church at the age of 3. As a pre-teen she joined a country band in her hometown of Graham, NC. She traveled extensively during her teen years playing such venues as Ernest Tubb’s Record Shop in Nashville TN and on Tony Grant’s “Stars of Tomorrow” in Atlantic City. Joanie married Mike Wood in 1980 and began singing duets with him in their home church. She now sings lead and harmony vocals with the Wood Family Tradition.

Sunday, August 23, 2015 at 2 PM

Mt Hope United Church of Christ
2400 Mt Hope Church Road
Whitsett NC 27377

Bring instrument for jam sessions

Youth Showcase with Jones Sisters opening!


Linda & Company

Linda & Company

Linda & Company consists of Linda Thore, Johnny Cox, Charles Long, Haley Owens, Randy Owens, and Donna Owens. The band was formed, for the most part, to provide entertainment for the folks who come to Brown’s Ole Opry each Friday night to dance and listen. “There were so many pickers when I first went there in 1994 that the stage and back room, referred to as the tuning room were jam packed literally” says Linda Thore. There was standing room only inside and summertime brought in lots of parking lot pickers.

Just five years ago, that had changed. It was sad to realize that people had almost stopped coming because musicians no longer showed up. Linda had talked to the person in charge and agreed to provide some music at least once a month. Right about that time she met Johnny Cox, Charles Long, and the Owens family. There were others that helped out at first but the six of them evolved into the band.

Linda Thore, guitar and vocals, comes from a very musical family. She sang from as early as she can remember and kept up with country and bluegrass music she heard on the radio and on records. She learned to play guitar from a mail ordered instruction book. Before long she started playing along with her father who played fiddle. She still has the 1946 Gibson guitar given to her by her Dad at Christmas that year. It had belonged to her brother who was a good singer and musician. Both sides of Linda’s family were musical. Her father was a left-handed fiddle player, her two brothers played several instruments, uncles and both Grandfathers played the fiddle. Her mother and sister had great singing voices. Linda’s main influences, other than family, were the Carter Family, the Louvin Brothers, Reno & Smiley, Emmy Lou Harris,  and the Rice Brother – Larry, Tony, Ronnie and Wyatt.

Johnny Cox, mandolin and vocals, is also a wonderful guitar player with a good singing voice. Like Linda, he comes from a musical family, the Long Brothers. He plays many instruments and is in much demand to play with other bands. His favorites are Norman Blake, Doc Watson, and Tony Rice

Charles Long, bass and vocals, also plays Dobro and guitar. He will sing especially if the others twist his arm. As mentioned before, he is one of the Long Brothers and is the uncle of Johnny Cox. His main influence was his Grandfather, Thomas Doss.

Haley Owens, banjo, what a talented young lady she is! She learned to play at age 12 and before long, she was playing proficiently. She has played with Carolina Breeze and other bands. It is amazing to see how well she and Johnny play the instrumentals. It’s synchronicity, Johnny says. Haley’s influences were Earl Scruggs, Tony Trischka, and Bela Fleck.

Randy Owens, lead guitar and bass, liked rock music before becoming interested in bluegrass music. Chicago and the Marshall Tucker band were some of his favorites. As a teenager, Randy played this style of music. He is Haley’s dad.

Donna Owens, washboard, is Haley’s Mom. She really enjoys playing and keeps excellent rhythm for the band. Her favorites in music are Kenny Chesney and Fleetwood Mac. There is much less “Tom Foolery” when Donna is with us and it is a joy to have her.


Sunday, July 26, 2015 at 2:00 PM

(Not 2:30pm as earlier reported)
Stonefield Cellars Winery
8220 NC Hwy 68 N
Stokesdale NC


Rich in Tradition

Rich in Tradition 2015

Rich in Tradition has been a band for many years. They have five extremely talented musicians.

Jay Adams – Banjo and Vocals: Jay grew up in Spray NC (now Eden). His main influences on the banjo include Earl Scruggs, J.D. Crowe, Gene Parker, and Craig Smith. Jay became a Christian at the age of 13 and rededicated his life to the Lord in 1987. He has been active at Floyd Baptist Church since. He serves as a deacon, Adult Sunday school teacher, and plays guitar and sings with his family and friends at church. Jay has written several gospel songs which have been recorded. He also enjoys hunting, restoring old Jeeps and does some instrument repair, too. He lives in Pine Hall, NC with his wife, Teresa, and has two daughters, Ellie and Katie. Jay says the most important part of his music is using it to lift up Christ and to share with others the many blessings that God has given him.

Greg Jones – Mandolin and Vocals: Greg was born in the heart of the bluegrass and old time haven Mt. Airy, N.C. Growing up with a family of musicians and singers made it a lot easier to get the pickin’ bug. At the ripe old age of 15, he found himself with a hankering to learn an instrument. So, in order to keep up with his brother who had learned the banjo 6 months earlier, he needed to get started. Influenced by an uncle nicknamed “Smoke”, he picked up the mandolin and started learning everything from Bill Monroe to David Grisman and Ricky Skaggs. Holding the hand of traditional bluegrass and contemporary new grass along with Grisman’s dawg music, Greg set out to learn all he could keep up with family and friends who could already pick and could do it well. Playing early on with several groups including, “The Cana River Boys”, “Backyard Bluegrass”, and “Boarderline”, Greg went on to play with more established bands such as “Piedmont Grass”, and the early versions of “The James King Band”. In 1994, he joined the bluegrass gospel group “Cornerstone”, staying with them until April of 2000, when the band split up to venture into other directions. Then, in May of 2000, Greg joined “The Bluegrass Tradition Band”. They had 1 recording, won the 2001 Galax Fiddlers Convention, and played at the 2002 National Folk Festival in Bangor, Maine. On July 3, 2003, at the Carter Fold in Hilton, Virginia, Greg got to perform with Johnny Cash. Bluegrass Tradition was scheduled to perform that night and Mr. Cash was to perform that night too. It turned out, that Mr. Cash needed a baritone singer and Greg was the only one in sight. This performance happened just 2 months before Johnny’s death. What an honor it was of Greg to take in that great moment. In 2004, Greg began to venture out again with some other bands, hooking up with legendary songwriter and banjo player Cullen Galyean and his band “The Bluegrassers”. Mickey Galyean, Cullen’s son, was also a member of the band. Their playing was always hot, but the singing was smokin’ hot. Greg and Mickey took turns with lead and tenor, while Cullen nailed the baritone every time. They played mostly at local festivals, private parties, and a fiddler’s convention here and there. Then in 2006 Greg and Mickey got together with Brad Hiatt on bass, Jay Adams on Banjo, and Tim Martin on fiddle, to form “Rich-in-Tradition”. Shortly after forming the band, they set the fiddler’s conventions ablaze, winning 4 out of 5 conventions (including Galax Fiddlers Convention). Greg says that his life has been a great ride and is ready for what lies ahead. Greg still lives in Mt. Airy with his wife Shannon, his son Daniel, and two daughters Katie and Emily.

Ronnie Edwards – Guitar and Vocals: Ronnie has been flatpicking for over forty years. He played with a band called “Commonwealth” from 1984 to 1987, then from 1987 to 1990 with “Summer Wages.” He then moved to Nashville in 1990 and was a songwriter for Crosswinds Publishing. He later wrote for MCA, Still Working Music, Major Bob Publishing (which is Garth Brooks’ Publishing Company) then he spent several years writing for Warner/Chappell. In the meantime, he had moved back to Mt. Airy and has been with Rich in Tradition since the first of 2012. Ronnie is married and has a daughter and a son.

Jake Harbour – Bass and Vocals: Jacob started playing music at the age of thirteen. He plays the banjo, guitar, and bass; and also enjoys singing baritone and lead. He has played, recorded and filled in with several bands in the Patrick County, VA area, as well as Stokes County, NC. Jacob gives his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ all of the credit for his musical abilities and is very thankful for his gift. He is currently attending Appalachian State University as an Elementary Education major. He is very excited to be playing the bass for Rich in Tradition and is enjoying every minute of it. When not playing music, you can find Jacob camping, hunting, four wheeler riding, participating in church activities, and spending time with his girlfriend, Caroline. Jacob lives in Danbury, NC.

Daniel Greeson – Fiddle: Daniel Greeson has been playing bluegrass fiddle since he was very young. Daniel at age 16 was already noted as an accomplished musician. He has won many prestigious competitions. He has established a name for himself at fiddler’s conventions throughout North Carolina, Virginia and Tennessee competing in both adult and youth divisions. AT age 18 now, Daniel will be attending East Tennessee State University after just graduating from High School this year. High Lonesome Strings has been blessed to have Daniel as a member for many years.


Sunday, June 28, 2015 at 2:30 PM

At Shelter 5

Hagan-Stone Park
5920 Hagan-Stone Park Road
Pleasant Garden NC 27313

Bring instrument for jam sessions




GrassStreetGrassStreet, based in central North Carolina, has entertained fans of all ages since 2003. Their mixture of original material and bluegrass standards along with their unique ability to cover musical styles ranging from rock to blues to jazz set them apart from the average bluegrass band. They pride themselves on an entertaining and high energy stage show full of the right balance of musical precision and humor. With influences ranging from the traditional sounds of Flatt & Scruggs to the progressive sounds of Seldom Scene and Tony Rice and with members with backgrounds in bluegrass, country, jazz, rock, and R&B there’s always something for every listener at a GrassStreet show.

GrassStreet has a contemporary musical format based on traditional styling with a modern presentation vocally and instrumentally. The material for this band is a mixture of bluegrass standards and original compositions. GrassStreet is a derivative of the band Swift Run which has performed regionally since the early ’80s with two albums to their credit and numerous awards. An album entitled Acoustic Pathways was released in December 2003 with Wayne’s son, David. Wayne wrote and arranged most of the material for the band’s debut album, Better Times, released in July 2004. An all gospel project, Grandma’s Hymnbook, was released in 2008. A sampling of GrassStreet’s live show is available in two live albums. The latest of the two is Showtime – recorded in 2011.

Wayne Kinton (guitar, vocals) is a Henderson, NC native. He is proficient in an array of musical styles from traditional string music to jazz and swing. His diverse musical background prepares him well for any musical setting. You could easily find Wayne at an old-fashioned bluegrass picking session, the orchestra pit with the community theater or ripping a Stratocaster in a rhythm and blues tune. His music has been featured in theater productions, TV/radio spots, video documentaries and an independent film. Wayne discovered bluegrass during the early ’70s while in college and this unique genre became his musical passion. After a childhood of being exposed to the stalwarts of traditional country/bluegrass artists through his dad, Wayne had a clear understanding of the roots of this music. However the influence of the contemporary bands of the ’70s drew him to stretch the boundaries of bluegrass. Always in an effort to make this musical format appeal to audiences outside of the bluegrass world, Wayne interjects elements of other genres into his music. This concept is evident in his musical direction through the years as well as in his songwriting. Wayne and his wife, Debbie, own an insurance business in Henderson. They are active in their church and community and enjoy spending time with their granddaughter, Chloe. On stage, Wayne plays a 1951 Martin D-18.

David Kinton (upright bass, mandolin, vocals) is a 2004 graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill with a minor in jazz studies, David has been performing since 1996 and is proficient in a variety of different styles of music with the acoustic bass as well as electric. While at UNC, he was active in the jazz studies program where he played upright bass with the UNC Jazz Band & Jazz Combos and is featured on their 2004 CD release, From One To Another. He has also performed and released a CD entitled Where You Are with a Christian rock band, DeeperStill, from Wake Forest, NC. He now resides in Durham, NC with his wife Steffi and daughter Chloe and works as a Web Designer for the UNC School of Medicine. David grew up with bluegrass music and followed his dad (Wayne) to bluegrass festivals since he was small. A love for bluegrass music developed as well as his musicianship. His solid timing as well as his various musical influences, contributes to this band’s intense drive and unique sound. David cites his dad Wayne as his biggest musical influence. Some of his bass heroes are Tom Gray, Ray Brown, Christian McBride, Todd Phillips, Mark Schatz and Jason Moore. David plays a 1952 Kay upright bass.

Ricky Hargis (Banjo, Vocals) is no stranger to the bluegrass scene. He started playing music around the age of 7, learning to play the autoharp and banjo from a neighbor down the road. He has played with many local and regional bands such as Carolina Express, Younger Mountain Boys, Lovers of Gospel, New Classic Grass and Second Chance. He can also be seen in the area filling in on banjo and bass with other local bands. Ricky makes his home in Roxboro, NC, where he is active in his church and community — playing music in nursing homes and playing bass for the church choir. Ricky’s finesse and melodic style of banjo adds a unique dimension to the GrassStreet sound without losing any of its signature drive. You can’t help but smile while watching Ricky enjoy himself on stage.

Tab Kearns (Dobro) joined the band in September 2008. He lives in Cary, NC with his wife and two children, Brandi and Justin. Tab’s taste and timing on the Dobro bring both a smooth and powerful touch to the band. His lead and backup on the slower songs really sets the mood and his aggressive attack on the more upbeat songs embellish the band’s hard-driving bluegrass edge. Of Tab’s many influences, he cites Duane Allman, Jimmy Page, Jerry Douglas and of course Josh Graves as his most influential musicians. Tab plays a Wolfe Indian Rosewood Resonator Guitar and a Scheerhorn Weissenborn guitar.

Sunday, April 19, 2015 @ 2:30 PM

Ragsdale Civic Center at Jamestown Town Hall
301 East Main Street
Jamestown, NC
(behind Town Hall and beside Fire Station)
Bring instrument for jam sessions


Ben Marshall & The Carolina Bluegrass Express

Ben Marshall and The Carolina Bluegrass Express

This young group of bluegrass musicians met back in 2011 when each of them were much younger. They all live hours away from each other but take every opportunity to perform together as able. Each of them travels with other bands in other areas. From the Sandhills all the way to the Blue Ridge Mountains, they represent traditional music well. You would not realize their ages when you hear each of them play and sing. Each are very active in other activities of their families, church and schools. You will see them at most fiddler’s conventions and each of them have proven their skills with ribbons in their respective instruments and sharing their talents with crowds of all ages. Bluegrass Today states “It’s probably pretty safe to say that many of today’s bluegrass musicians first learned to play, or at least to appreciate, bluegrass music from a family member”.

The best example of this is father-son duo of Eric Marshall and Ben Marshall – 14 years old, who hail from the Mt. Airy, North Carolina area. Eric, who has been playing banjo with the regional group The Marshall Brothers and Highroad since the late 90s, first taught Ben to play bass when he was so young he had to stand on a picnic table to reach the neck of his instrument. Several years later, they’ve released their first album together (with a little help from Eric’s band), entitled Grass Roots Project. Ben, from a very young age, has been sought after by bands everywhere he goes to carry the rhythm and sing lead and tenor vocals.

Daniel Greeson, age 17, is from Jamestown, NC. He has been playing bluegrass fiddle since age 6. He studied under master fiddler JB Prince and plays with bands from the piedmont of North Carolina and Southwest Virginia. He released his 1st solo CD in 2014 at IBMA World of Bluegrass Streetfest. He is also a part of the Christmas Along the Crooked Road project and Mountain Roads Recordings’ Close Kin-Our Roots Run Deep. Daniel is a student at Southern Guilford Academy of Medical Science and he is a member of the Hunter Safety and Golf Teams.

Jacob Greer, age 16, hails from the traditional music-rich mountains of North Carolina, calling Jefferson his home. He began playing guitar at age 8 and singing came naturally, shortly thereafter. Jacob began taking bluegrass guitar lessons from former national champion, Mr. Steve Lewis, in January, 2012. He continues to meet with Steve on a weekly basis. Jacob plays a custom D-18 guitar, built especially for him by his friend, luthier Caleb Smith, who is best known as guitarist and vocalist for the group Balsam Range. Jacob has competed in many contests, locally and nationally, and won numerous awards for his guitar and vocal talents. He has played with bands for events at several large venues. Recently, he was accepted into the International Bluegrass Music Association Kids on Bluegrass program and was inducted into Tomorrow’s Bluegrass Stars. He is appreciative for each invitation and opportunity to play and share the Bluegrass Music he loves with others, and is thankful for the musical gifts he has been blessed with.

Joshua Allen, age 17 of Robbins NC, plays any instrument you hand him. He has received many prized ribbons at Fiddler’s Conventions throughout the Sandhills of North Carolina; Star, the Oldest Convention in North Carolina and also at High Falls Fiddler’s Convention at North Moore High School and in Seagrove. He began playing on a mandolin given to him by his grandfather at age 3. As years went by, he took mandolin lessons from Jerry Stuart and banjo with Stan Brown, both master traditional bluegrass musicians. Joshua’s other pass times include hunting, fishing and golf.

These musicians like to perform each year for Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver Bluegrass Music Festival Open Mic. Watch for them again this year on Wednesday night, May 6th at Denton Farm Park.

They will be leading worship at Oakdale United Methodist Church (532 Oakdale Road, Jamestown, NC) at 10 am on Sunday morning, April 19 before joining High Lonesome Strings later in the day for their monthly meeting. Spread the word. Everyone is invited!


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.